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Trijicon – 40 Years of Innovation

 

By any measure Trijicon is a study in the classic American success story. A venture launched by an immigrant with little more than entrepreneurial spirit, exceptional engineering acumen and an unwavering Christian faith, has grown into a multi-million-dollar enterprise that continues to be an industry leader and technology innovator. 

Founder Glyn Bindon had traveled to his native South Africa in 1980 to meet with a colleague who hoped to bring a luminous gun sight to the U.S. market. Originally recruited simply to be a liaison to U.S. distributors, Bindon became intrigued by the possibilities of self-illuminating sights and decided to lend his unique engineering genius to the venture. In 1981 Armson, Inc. was born. 

As an inventor, Bindon recognized and capitalized on the possibilities presented by the use of tritium to create illumination for up to 15 years without batteries. He also was among the first to tap the commercial potential of fiber optics. Blending the two, he revolutionized military and sporting optics. 

His early experiments led to Trijicon’s Bright & Tough Night Sights for handguns and soon after, the FBI began equipping its agents with Trijicon night sights, taking the company to a new level of viability. 

During this time, Bindon designed and developed the iconic Advanced Combat Optical Gunsight (ACOG). The fixed magnification riflescope could work in everything from bright light to no light, and with aircraft-aluminum-alloy construction boasted the rugged durability needed for battlefield use. Its optics allowed everything from distance marksmanship to close quarter battle capabilities – including the two-eyes-open aiming concept developed by Bindon himself − making it an instant success with the military and law enforcement. When the Department of Defense ordered scopes for deployed forces, Trijicon experienced exponential growth. 

In 1998, Trijicon introduced the Trijicon AccuPoint 3-9×40, dual-illuminated riflescope with hunters in mind, which features BAC rapid target acquisition.

The AccuPoint line continues to expand and is a pillar of the Trijicon variable riflescope offering. 

In 2004 the 4×32 ACOG was chosen as “The Official Rifle Combat Optic” (RCO) for the U. S. Marine Corps and in 2005 the 100,000th 4×32 ACOG was produced. 

Not a company to rest on their success, Trijicon continued to innovate and in 2009 launched the Trijicon RMR (Ruggedized Miniature Reflex), featuring a unique shaped housing for strength. The RMR, originally designed as a rifle optic, was soon discovered to be an extremely durable handgun sight. 

Over the next few years, Trijicon continued its product expansion in both the RMR and ACOG families. It also launched their HD Night Sights with improved daytime sight acquisition accuracy and in 2013 the Trijicon VCOG (Variable Combat Optical Gunsight) a 1-6×24 riflescope bringing the legendary ACOG durability to a variable powered optic. 

In 2015 Trijicon raised the bar again with the introduction of the Miniature Rifle Optic (MRO). In the tradition of great product development, the team designed, among other things, an over-sized front objective to help reduce user frustrations with “tube effect” common to red dot sights. The Trijicon MRO was selected as Guns & Ammo magazine’s 2015 Optic of the Year. 

In 2017, Trijicon introduced its Electro Optics Division with best-in-class thermal riflescopes including 12-micron technology, 640×480 thermal sensors and digital OED display. Trijicon also produced its One Millionth 4×32 ACOG. We think Glyn Bindon would have been proud. And amazed. 

In 2019, Trijicon launched three new products: Trijicon Fiber Sights, the Trijicon SRO and the Trijicon VCOG 1-8×28. The VCOG 1-8×28 was subsequently selected as the USMC Squad Common Optic (SCO) in 2020. 

The company also recently launched the Trijicon OASYS line of thermal optics—high-performance, military-grade thermal optics for elite users around the world. 

The year 2020 brought more brilliant aiming solutions when Trijicon introduced six all new riflescope categories for the hunting, tactical, competition and long-range communities, as well as new models in its AccuPoint line. Two of the new families are the Trijicon Huron, developed specifically for the North American whitetail deer hunter, and the Trijicon Ascent a tactical riflescopes specifically designed for shooters who constantly want to improve their skills. Both the Huron and Ascent have premium glass, proven precision and rugged durability and are Trijicon’s first foray into non-illuminated variable powered scopes. 

The Trijicon Credo was designed based on expertise from decades of deployment with America’s greatest fighting forces, built into a family of tactical riflescopes. Along with its hunting counterpart the Trijicon Credo HX offer rapid target acquisition from dawn to dusk, along with the durable construction Trijicon is known for. 

For those who shoot long distances, Trijicon developed the Trijicon Tenmile to provide absolute accuracy and precision at extreme distances. And for long-range hunters, the Trijicon Tenmile HX is excellent for dialing in shots at long range. 

Not to be overlooked is the Trijicon AccuPoint. They have the battery-free dual illuminated technology Trijicon is known for. Its enhanced accuracy in low light or no light make the AccuPoint an excellent option for all hunters and shooters. With the addition of several magnifications and reticles, the AccuPoint family now boasts nine different magnifications with nearly 70 different reticle configurations. 

In 2020 Trijicon also launched the MRO HD with complex reticle and the RMRcc – a reliable and rugged miniature reflex for concealed carry. 

But while it is easy to look at Trijicon’s technology story as the driving force in its success, it would be somewhat misleading. The real key has been the people.

In Trijicon’s workforce, there are dozens who have been with the company for more than two decades – and many examples of multiple family members working at the firm. 

The final piece of the Trijicon story is the faith-based leadership of the Bindon family. While the media was quick to jump on the company’s practice of inscribing Biblical verses on its products when the Department of Defense required them to eliminate the quotes from scopes for US troops – they failed to note that the Bindon’s faith was not some marketing affectation; it was the bedrock of the company’s success. 

The principles of the Bindon’s Christian faith have guided their dealings with employees, vendors and customers from the very start – not in a Madison Avenue “look at what we do” manner – but in a quiet, more meaningful way that has allowed the company to ride the ups and downs of business wins and losses without losing sight of what is truly important. 

And that sense of balance and unyielding support of its people – as surely as the award-winning products – is the true key to the Trijicon success story.

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