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SCI Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that funds and directs worldwide programs dedicated to wildlife conservation and outdoor education. SCI Foundation ensures that the best available science is used in wildlife policy and management and demonstrates the constructive role that hunting and hunters play in the conservation of biodiversity around the world. The organization is First For Wildlife, investing millions of dollars into wildlife conservation and education every year.

The Conservation Department at SCI Foundation partners with academic institutions, community-based support organizations, and conservation non-governmental organizations to complete wildlife research and management projects all over the world.  Since 2000, we have put over $70 million in hunter dollars to work on over 100 conservation projects in 30 countries.  Some of our programs include:

  • North America: SCI Foundation is a strong supporter of the North American Model of Wildlife Management and firmly believes that the hunter-conservationist is the key to future conservation efforts in North America. We have supported projects in 23 states and provinces involving a range of species.  Recent foci have been on the interactions between hunted species and expanding predator populations, grizzly and black bear populations, and declining mule deer populations in the West and white-tailed deer in the upper Midwest.
  • Africa: SCI Foundation has a long history of success in Africa. We work to support African states in managing their wildlife resources sustainably for the long-term benefit of their land, their people, and wildlife communities.  We are currently supporting research to identify the most accurate and efficient methods to survey African lions and leopards so that these iconic species will continue to be conserved through sustainable use.
  • Asia: Many central Asian countries are in the early stages of developing a sustainable use conservation model, but SCI Foundation has been present with our partners in the region since 2010. We support building capacity for local community-based conservation throughout the region, including projects in Kazakhstan, Pakistan, and Tajikistan.
  • Antipoaching: Illegal harvest for meat or body parts is a primary threat to many wildlife species worldwide, especially rhinoceros and elephant in Africa.  SCI Foundation has supported antipoaching efforts all over the world through grants, partnerships, and capacity-building efforts.
  • Matching Grants: The SCI Foundation supports SCI Chapters in their efforts to contribute toward conservation projects in their local areas. If a Chapter supports a research or management project, they can apply for matching funds from the Foundation to increase their impact.  In 2018, the Foundation contributed over $30,000 to local conservation efforts through matching grants to the chapters.

The annual African Wildlife Consultative Forum (AWCF) is SCI Foundation's premier activity in Africa, bringing together a diverse group of international stakeholders, senior government delegates, professional hunting associations, policy experts and wildlife biologists. Discussions at this forum center on African wildlife issues and coordinating responses to current events.

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Featured Articles

Recent Conservation Articles

We Need YOUR Help to Fight for No-Net-Loss!

By Claire Fortenberry | November 15, 2021

Sign the Petition! SCI has launched a new webpage, No-Net-Loss, to provide the educational resources and tools to support a No-Net-Loss policy. No-net-loss means maintaining or increasing the current level of hunting and fishing access on public lands across the country. Following significant access expansions from the Trump Administration, Safari Club International is fighting

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SCI Stands for Conservation and Hunting in EU Action Plan

By Claire Fortenberry | November 12, 2021

The European Union is working on an initiative to prevent the illegal trade in wildlife as it continues to threaten biodiversity, ecological health, and human well-being, particularly in the wake of the COVID-19 Pandemic. SCI and SCI European Chapters submitted feedback on the initiative this week encouraging the European Commission

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DOES PRIMARY PREY THEORY PROTECT CARIBOU IN BC?

By Claire Fortenberry | November 11, 2021

Caribou are listed under the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The long-term conservation and eventual restoration of stable caribou populations are national and provincial priorities shared by hunters and other conservationists. The Guide Outfitters Association of BC (GOABC) and SCI Canada support conservation, stewardship, and sustainable use of wildlife. Together with conservation partners Safari

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Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF) Kicks Off 19th Annual AWCF in Botswana

By Claire Fortenberry | November 8, 2021

(Kasane, Botswana) – Today marks the first day of the 19th annual African Wildlife Consultative Forum (AWCF), hosted this year by the Botswana Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources Conservation and Tourism’s Department of Wildlife and National Parks in Kasane.  AWCF is a collaborative conference, organized by the Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF), for

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Take a Stand for Hunting Rights in Alaska!

By Claire Fortenberry | November 4, 2021

On November 17th, the Federal Subsistence Board will be holding a public hearing on the temporary special action request to close hunting of moose and caribou on the federal public lands of Units 23 and 26A in Alaska. Thanks in part to the efforts of SCI members and advocates, this decision was deferred

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SCI and Acadiana Chapter Continue Louisiana Black Bear Efforts

By Claire Fortenberry | November 3, 2021

Safari Club International recently took one more step in its years-long advocacy efforts related to the Louisiana black bear.  A subspecies of black bear, the Louisiana black bear was listed as a threatened species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) in 1992.  By 2016, the bears had recovered and were

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